Non-anglo names barrier for job hunters: Study

Some of you may have noticed this high-profile news story from yesterday. A new study indicates that job applicants with English-sounding names on their resumes are 40 per cent more likely to be called for an interview than those with Chinese, Indian or Pakistani names.
You should read the whole study(40 pp. pdf)if you are curious about this or want more information but I would like to point out a couple of items of interest.

Even when applicants had identical Canadian work experiences and educational backgrounds, every 100 resumes with English names resulted in roughly 16 calls from employers. For every 100 resumes with Asian names, only 11 generated calls from employers. That means a resume with an English name was 40-per-cent more likely to generate a call back.

Leaving apart the obviously distressing implications of the above paragraph this confirms the conventional wisdom about sending in resumes for posted jobs. The call-back rate from employers is very low (16% and 11%) in this case. If you are not networking and meeting employers this would mean you would only get between 11 and 16 call-backs for every 100 resumes you send out. Only sending out resumes to posted jobs is a very passive approach.

The other item I wanted to point out from the study was this interesting point about Canadian work experience:

Employers valued experience acquired in Canada much more than if acquired in a foreign country. Changing foreign resumes to include only experience from Canada raised callback rates to 11 percent.  Among resumes listing 4 to 6 years of Canadian experience, whether an applicant’s degree was from Canada or not, or whether the applicant obtained additional Canadian education or not had no impact on the chances for an interview request.

 This underlines the importance of gaining work in your field. Employers seem to value this more than gaining further credentials in this country.

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